Tag Archive | tree

Squirrels in my yard

The thaws and freezes have been tough on the squirrels, which my wife feeds. Normally this time of year they would be in a squirrel equivalent of hibernation tucked into their nests. The sunshine and promise of peanuts has drawn them out. Roughly six squirrels live in the neighborhood. But the peanuts also bring out […]

How to turn a mediocre scene into a great shot.

Photography always comes down to; did you capture it right?

Blogs, websites, and Twitter are full of helpful hints and guidance on proper use of a DLSR. ISO, Aperture, Shutter Speed, White Balance, Histogram, Program Controls, Manual Controls are all significant aspects of making an image.

But a good photograph still depends on the underlying foundation of Composition and Perspective.

Last weekend I was walking the dog down by the tracks in town and came upon this scene.

tracks, panorama, abandoned, winter

Panorama of Tracks next to Selinsgrove Inn. Shot on an iPod.

The rail line is a spur connecting the regional line to a few businesses and the local university (Susquehanna University). Trains are uncommon, at perhaps few times a week, and the rail bed is in rough shape. One line is out of commission. The panorama above captures pretty well the location and environment. It is not particularly photogenic as a landscape or an architectural shot. Other than the dog, the only good aspect is the sky.

grass, railroad, rail bed, abandoned

Wide Angle shot of Abandoned track.

But the tuft of grass growing in the rail bed was interesting. However the background, at best, detracts from the shot and had to be removed. The angle from the shot above plows the grass into the tracks and bed. This necessitates it being tighter and lower to the ground.

Cropped and worked up image of abandoned track. f2.0, 1/1500, ISO 250, Nikkor f1.8 35mm DX

Cropped and worked up image of abandoned track. f2.0, 1/1500, ISO 250, Nikkor f1.8 35mm DX

I used a f1.8 35mm DX lens. That’s the rough equivalent of a 50mm lens on a full frame sensor. Fortunately these inexpensive primes are clear from side to side. Additionally, it let me open way up to render a nice soft bokah. Note that the for ground  and background are blurred. At f2, only the grass is really in focus, which adds emphasis. My other walk about lens is a 18-105 mm 3.5-5.6. With that lens, I’d be able to shoot at maybe f4.8, which would have brought the ugly houses in the background into significantly sharper focus.

What did I do in Post? Not a whole lot. I’m a journeyman at best in LR and PS. At 35mm, I had to crop out the telephone pole and building on the left. I did have to warm the white balance, which was much to cool for the actual image and brought out the yellows/oranges a bit to make it pop. Finally, because it was a cloudy day, I shot at a half stop over and used the gradient tool to mute the clouds which were too bright. A higher resolution version is found here.

Hope you liked my process on this shot. I’ll be posting as regularly as life and employment allow.

I’ll be happy to field questions if you have any.

Cheers,

CameraChemist

Long exposure forest stream

Silky dreamy water is very popular, especially with reasonably priced neutral density filters and good glass for DLSRs. One of my favorites blog posts shows how this technique can be used to powerful effect. (30-breathtaking-long-exposure-photos-with-water). These shots are simply outstanding and obviously done by someone with a great eye, quality equipment, and enough free time to capture the composition properly.

Can an enthusiast with a midrange DSLR, a mediocre lens, a 2-stop ND filter, and only an afternoon make a similar photo? Well, yes. Is it up to the standard above? Perhaps debatable.

The photo posted below was taken at R.B. Winter State Park in central Pennsylvania. Its a great little park with hiking trails, a sandy beach, places to camp, and a fantastic stream that cuts through it all. There is enough of a slope that there are several small falls and areas of rolling water. A higher resolution version can be found here.

A long exposure of a Stream at RB Winter state park, PA. ND4 filter used to increase exposure time.

A long exposure of a Stream at RB Winter state park, PA. ND4 filter used to increase exposure time. f16, ISO 200, 1.5s at 75mm

This spot was actually quite cramped. There was a slightly better location in the middle of the stream, but I could not get the tripod in there. The most difficult aspect was the long exposure. A 2 stop ND filter and 200 ISO is really not enough light dampening. Fortunately it was a misty and dreary day, which was all the difference.  A 4 stop filter, especially stacked, will have to be in the future.

Post work was relatively minor.  Bumped up the vibrance, contrast and saturation. The most significant modification was the top of the image. It was far too bright and drew the eye to the far bank instead of the soft water in the forground. The exposure was dropped about half a stop for opposite side of the stream.

Favorite time of year.

Autumn is my favorite time of year for photography. In central PA, the mix of hills and trees make for rich and varied work.
This is an image of a nearby yard that I’ve enjoyed walking by. The photo was downloaded from LR through Mosaic on my iPod, which explains the lack of resolution. Most of this post was done on my iPod. As I get more familiar with WordPress, the more dynamic WP really seems to be.

tree, pine tree, maple, leaves, orange, red, pretty

Japanese Maple and Pine tree

I spend my fall collecting images because the winter is typically uninspiring and dull. Below is a bit or rural decay. I’ve noticed that most street photographers and urban photographers, are just that urban. Living in an old small town that has slowly declined as manufacturing jobs have moved over seas, these types of images are prevalent. And I live in a one of the better towns.

shed, street, rural decay, winter, gloomy,

Falling down shed

Winter will be spend working up older photos, waiting for the occasional nice day outside, and shooting macro inside.